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JREF Swift Blog
Swift, named for Jonathan Swift, is the JREF's daily blog, featuring content from James Randi, the JREF staff, and other featured authors.

Suggestions for the US PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by James Randi   

Reader John P. Stoltenberg, Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, offers these suggestions for us to adopt. I’m all in favor of them:

  • If you don’t believe in gay marriages or in abortions, don't have one. If you don’t believe in euthanasia or in physician-assisted death, then die your own way.
  • Maintain strict separation of church and state.
  • Allow no displays of religious icons or symbols in government buildings or on government lands.
  • Recall our ambassador from the Vatican.
  • Allow no state or federal voucher programs.
  • Remove "under God" from the U.S. Pledge of Allegiance, and "In God We Trust" from all American currency.
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Sauce For the Goose and For the Gander PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by James Randi   

On April 16th, 2009, the Consumer Health Digest announced that the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) had issued a statement that sharply criticized "reiki," which is based on the same ancient notion that the human body is surrounded with the usual undefined "energy field" that cannot be detected nor measured by ordinary scientific instrumentation, of course. Reiki practitioners claim to be able to facilitate healing by strengthening or "balancing" this "force."

The thoroughly aroused USCCB stated that reiki lacks scientific credibility, has not been accepted by the scientific and medical communities as an effective therapy, and that reputable scientific studies attesting to its efficacy are lacking, as is a plausible scientific explanation as to how it could possibly be efficacious. Reiki, they complain, finds no support in the findings of natural science, either. So there.

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ABC Reports Psychics Contributing to Bad Economy PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by Jeff Wagg   

ABC News reports in this article that at least one pyschic business is up at least 7% due to the economic crisis. My question for ABC is... why is this news?  First off, it's old news. Second, why is it news at all? If anything, the story should read "Psychics Make a Bad Situation Worse." Why? Because they're taking money from people who are having money problems, and giving them advice that they're unqualified to give.

I'd love to do this test, if it were possible. Give two people $100. One them will use the $100 to get a reading about their financial future from a psychic, and the other will invest it in an index fund; let's say the Nasdaq. If we compare the results in two years, who's going to be ahead? Even if the market goes down, I'm going to guess the investor will be ahead, because you can bet the psychic is going to encourage repeat visits, and that original $100 is never going to come back.

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Believing is Seeing PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by Jeff Wagg   

While I was preparing my report on the El Chupacabra phenomenon for The Amazing Adventure 4, it became clear that people were interpreting all manner of unexplained animal activity as the work of the legendary goat sucker. 100 years ago, this wouldn’t have been possible. Why? Because 100 years ago, El Chupacabra didn’t exist as an idea. No one could have believed in it because no one had thought of it yet.

“Seeing is believing” is an old expression, and one could argue that it’s the basis of skepticism. It translates to “I’ll believe it when I have evidence for it.” But evaluating that evidence is actually quite tricky. In fact, the reciprocal expression is also true: believing is seeing.

An example I often give is the “noise in the basement.” You’re home alone and the power goes out. The fuse box is in the basement, and you decide to tip-toe down the rickety stairs. Of course you can’t find your flashlight, so you’re using your iPhone to light your way. You see the fuse box behind a stack of old boxes, and you curse yourself for not anticipating the need for a clear path.

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Farewell John Maddox PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by James Randi   

maddoxI am once again diminished by the loss of a friend. Sir John Maddox, former editor - twice - of the prestigious science journal, Nature, has passed away. This small ceremony of acknowledging his existence is only slightly tempered by the fact that he had attained the respectable age of 83, had earned the respect, gratitude, and admiration of the scientific community, and he had given me, personally, many insights into the workings of his perceptive, considerate, and careful thought processes during my limited experience with him.

John was mostly tweed. Welsh by birth, craggy in appearance, and the very image of a scholar and intellectual, he was the sort of man for whom Harris Tweed was created. They complimented one another: tough and strong, serviceable and dependable, dignified and adaptable to the real world, and attractive in a totally practical sense, John Maddox and his favored attire worked together to present the world with their image of a British man of letters who took no nonsense, stated his case, made his point, and gave us the benefit of his wit, wisdom, and intellect, in full. It is said that his editorship of Nature was what put it in the forefront of science reporting.

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