The Amazing Meeting 2014

Like it? Share it!

Sign up for news and updates!






Enter word seen below
Visually impaired? Click here to have an audio challenge played.  You will then need to enter the code that is spelled out.
Change image

CAPTCHA image
Please leave this field empty

Login Form



Bigfoot! The Search Continues PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by Maria Myrback   

Whether it's called Yowie, in Australia, Mapinguari in the Amazon, the Yeti in Tibet, or Yeren in China, Bigfoot myths and sightings have pervaded cultures around the world since the early 1800’s. Described as having long white, reddish or brown hair, this bipedal creature reportedly stands between five and feet tall and sometimes weighs over five-hundred pounds. A common factor in close sightings is the beast's incredible stench. According to castings of footprints, Bigfoot has five toes, but it has been known to have as few as two. Sometimes it even has claws.

One of the earliest documented sighting of such a creature was mentioned in James Prinsep’s Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, in 1832. An explorer in north Nepal, B.H. Hodgeson reported that his guide saw what appeared to be “a tall, bipedal creature covered in long, dark hair.” After evaluation, Hodgeson concluded that his guide saw an orangutan.

Just a few years later, in 1876, in Australia, a creature called Yowie was mentioned in the Australian Town And Country Journal. The writer asked readers, “Who has not heard, from the earliest settlement of the colony, the blacks speaking of some unearthly animal or inhuman creature […] namely the Yahoo-Devil Devil, or hairy man of the wood…” This version of “indigenous ape” reportedly stood around five feet in height with very long black hair, with dirty red fur about its throat and chest. The Yowie appears in Aboriginal folklore and mythology.

According to folklore, Bigfoot sightings on the North American continent began as early as 1811 in Jasper, in Alberta, Canada. Dave Thompson, a trader, found odd tracks approximately fourteen inches long and eight inches wide in the snow. The print held the impression of only four toes. Stories persisted south and west from the coast until Bigfoot “arrived” in the US in 1924.

The story goes as follows: A group of miners near Mount St. Helens supposedly spotted a Bigfoot and shot it, apparently killing the animal. That night the creature's friends surrounded the cabin. They proceeded to throw stones at the building, pound on the walls and climb on the roof. The attack continued till dawn. The next day the miners packed up and abandoned the mine. The place is now called Ape Canyon.

There was a smattering of other sightings in the northeast, but nothing significant until the Roger Patterson and Robert Gimlin film of 1967. There was mass media coverage including a movie shown nationally that investigated Bigfoot along with other cryptids. Two years later, in 1969, reports of the Florida Skunk Ape started cropping up. Now Bigfoot and his ilk are ranging on six of the seven continents. Even South America has the distant “cousin.” the Mapinguari.

The Bigfoot phenomenon has become such a part of mainstream culture that the Walt Disney Corporation has used the Yeti as a main character in one of its newer attractions, Expedition Everest. Disney Imagineers went to the Himalayas to research the project before bringing the creature to life through advanced audio animatronics. There, the Yeti is a guardian of the mountains, scaring off unwanted visitors and keeping the mountain safe. (The Yeti also makes a couple appearances in Disneyland’s older attraction, Matterhorn Bobsleds.)

Recently, CNN reported that the Chinese group, Hubei Wild Man Research Association, has announced that they will be launching a new search for the Yeti. They are recruiting international researchers to join them in Shennongjia forest region of Hubei. The last researchers to seek out the Wild Man, a group in the early 1980’s, turned up inconclusive evidence, though they claim that the hair samples found are evidence of the existence of the creature. Since the 1970’s over 400 sightings have been reported in the Shennongjia region.

The HWMRA hopes to find $1.5 million (US equivalent) through grants and donations from corporations.

Trackback(0)
Comments (9)Add Comment
...
written by Galadriel, October 19, 2010
Psst. 1st paragraph, "reportedly stands between five and feet tall" probably is missing a word.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +4
Oh rang uh tan
written by Caller X, October 19, 2010
One of the earliest documented sighting of such a creature was mentioned in James Prinsep’s Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, in 1832. An explorer in north Nepal, B.H. Hodgeson reported that his guide saw what appeared to be “a tall, bipedal creature covered in long, dark hair.” After evaluation, Hodgeson concluded that his guide saw an orangutan.


That would have to be the tallest, swimmingest orangutan on record, since they top out at 5 feet and it would have had to swim to Nepal.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +6
...
written by MadScientist, October 19, 2010
A bigfoot article which never mentions Ray Wallace - I have to wonder why since Wallace's prank was the center of one of the best known Bigfoot crazes.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +0
@ MadScientist
written by Caller X, October 19, 2010
Two reasons: because the article isn't about hoaxes, and because you didn't write the article.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +4
Museym
written by Wave, October 20, 2010
If you find yourself in Portland, ME, a visit to the International Museum of Cryptozoology is an entertaining and informative way to spend a half hour or so. For five bucks you get a guided tour of the exhibits by a knowledgeable and fairly reasonable person. They even have some scat that is allegedly from a Yeti.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +0
Legends 'r' us
written by popsaw, October 20, 2010
Let them have their Bigfoots, Nessies and father Xmas's. Just a bit of fun and I doubt anyone really believes. Even if they do, there is no harm done.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: -3
Dearth of Skepticism in this article
written by grieve, October 20, 2010
This article looks like something I would read in my local newspaper. If it were not on a skeptic web site I would assume it is pro bigfoot belief. As it is, I am confused. What's the point?

I was hoping to see something like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B..._community at the end.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +3
...
written by FledgelingSkeptic, October 23, 2010
That first paragraph should read "between five and ten feet tall".
Grieve, the point of the article is to explore the effect that crypid myths like Bigfoot and its cousins have on cultures world wide. Big, furry, unexplained primate sightings can be traced around the world. You can literally track the progress of the myth as it made its way from Nepal to the US. From an anthropological standpoint alone, that's fascinating. Add to that, the Chinese are re-launching their hunt for their version of Bigfoot, the Wild Man, regardless of a lack of evidence. Their only reason appears to be a recent increase in sightings.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +0
Ah!
written by grieve, October 24, 2010
@FledgelingSkeptic
I wish the information you posted in your response to me had been in the original article in some form or fashion. It makes it clear what you are trying to do with the article, and I agree with you that is is fascinating from a anthropological standpoint. Thanks for following up.
report abuse
vote down
vote up
Votes: +1

Write comment
This content has been locked. You can no longer post any comment.
You must be logged in to post a comment. Please register if you do not have an account yet.

busy