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Crop Circles Explained! (Again) PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by Jeff Wagg   

drunktasAt the JREF, we don't talk about crop circles very much. They're still out there, in fact an interesting new one that depicts Pi was recently discovered. But ever since people started coming forward to admit that they'd created complex circles using no more than a board, two ropes, and the lines left by irrigation equipment, the scientific community has lost interest.

They may have done so prematurely. You see, there is new evidence that a non-human lifeform is responsible for at least some crop circles appearing recently in Tasmania, and it's not what you think.

No, the Tasmanian Devil is not responsible. However, one of his cousins may be. To quote the LA Times:

...we have a problem with wallabies entering poppy fields, getting as high as a kite and going around in circles," Giddings told those assembled. "Then they crash. We see crop circles in the poppy industry from wallabies that are high.

That's right, wallabies... small kangaroo-like marsupials apparently enjoy opium as much as humans do and take advantage of Tasmania's rich (and legal) crops. They lose their senses and run around creating circles in the crops.

While this is FAR from explaining all crop circles everywhere, and it's interesting to note that the "people with boards" explanation isn't sufficient to explain all crop circles. These opium fields are under heavy security, so if people were entering to make circles, the growers would be VERY interested to know how they managed it.

Drunk wallabies are less of a concern.

Several growers have witnessed animals enjoying the fruits of their labors, and for some reason, wallabies tend to "dance" in circles when under the influence. Also, it's interesting to note that the wallabies don't seem to get addicted. Once they've had their fun, the head back into the wild.

Do animals explain other crop circles? Possibly. Author Freddy Silva suggests that mating hedgehogs have created at least some crop circles in England. Apparently, the male chases the female around and around flattenng crops in the process.

So between stoned wallabies, sex-crazed hedghogs, and mathematically mischievous people with lumber, maybe we can put this one to rest for awhile.