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L. Ron Hubbard's Dystopia On Earth: An Ex-Scientologist Speaks Out PDF Print E-mail
Swift
Written by Penn Bullock & Brandon K. Thorp   

Aaron-Saxton-gallery

Aaron Saxton

If, as is claimed to prospective members, Scientology is the “only major religion to have emerged in the 20th century,” then it is currently experiencing a growing pain common to all religions entering adolescence: The schism. David Miscavige, the slick little salesman who took over the Church of Scientology after the death of noted junkie and fugitive L. Ron Hubbard, has lately been accused of abusing his underlings and lying to his flock to obfuscate his own failures as a spiritual leader. Scientologists around the world are breaking off from the official Church, claiming that it has “strayed from the original philosophy and purpose of the group which Hubbard first researched and developed."

But some ex-Scientologists have less regard for the teachings of L. Ron Hubbard. One of them is Aaron Saxton, a New Zealander who spent eight years — from his mid-teens through his early 20s — as part of Scientology’s elite paramilitary corps, Sea Org. Read on to learn his thoughts on Independent Scientologists, Sea Org, violence, coerced abortion, rape, false imprisonment, and the many other delights allegedly awaiting those who take seriously L. Ron Hubbard’s declaration that “your search is over, but the adventure has just begun.”

Aaron Saxton was born into The Church of Scientology in 1974 and left it in 2006. In the intervening years, he says, he tried coercing female Sea Org members into undergoing abortions, falsely imprisoned his fellows in the Church, both witnessed and engaged in the psychological abuse of children, and was denied even routine medical treatment. (He has alleged that he was once forced to remove his own teeth without anesthesia.)

Since Saxton went public in 2009, the Church of Scientology has apparently initiated a smear campaign against his character, and generally set about making his life miserable. But that hasn’t kept him from being heard. His accusations have brought him considerable renown in both his native country and in Australia, where he has found a sympathetic audience in Senator Nick Xenophon, who paired Saxton’s claims with those of other ex-Scientologists and read them into that country’s parliamentary record.

The world is full of ex-Scientologists, but few claim to have been so highly ranked in the Church, and few have been able to offer glimpses into the weird world of the Sea Org. Perhaps it is telling that lower-ranking Scientologists tend to remember their former church more fondly than Saxton does. It was a New York Times story profiling such mild apostates that inspired Saxton to give us the final go-ahead to publish this interview, after many weeks during which Saxton weighed the pros and cons of risking further exposure, publicity, and Scientological wrath by releasing his story to the JREF. The NYT story doesn’t go far enough, says Saxton. It lends credence to the notion that the problems now facing Scientology are organizational rather than doctrinal, and that Scientology can be a vibrant, positive religion if released from the control of David Miscavige and his minions. Saxton maintains that this is not the case: Scientology is rotten from its roots. The schism, though understandable, is doomed.

Scientology might be the most jargon-y religion in the world. Its members are conversant with dozens of strange words and acronyms that would be meaningless to those outside the Church, and Aaron Saxton still uses many of them. In transcribing this interview we translated as much of the jargon as possible, and decoded most of the obscure acronyms. (For example: Saxton never said “Religious Technology Center”; he said “RTC.”) Even with the decoding, parts of the interview can be hard-going. Stick with it, and try to pick up the meanings from context. We hope the interview proves illuminating.

– BKT, PB

 

Swift: How do you feel the Times story is biased toward the Scientologists?

Aaron Saxton: A new Scientology [as discussed in the story] is not really possible, as it was flawed from the beginning and cannot ever withstand the rigorous testing of science. This is why L. Ron Hubbard created a religion after Dianetics — which was called a “modern science of mental health.” He was asked for proof and could provide no solid evidence to back his claims. Thus, he started a religion, which under the protections of faith could not be questioned. The Scientologists that are currently dissatisfied with the Church are tending to shift the blame towards the current management, when in fact all activities of management are as per L. Ron Hubbard policy. The real issue is that the true nature of Hubbard’s policies is coming to light and it is creating a PR scandal. Therefore, the only scapegoat available, if not Hubbard himself, is the current management.

Briefly, what is the Sea Org?

The Sea Organization is the super-cult of this century. Totally different from being an ordinary Scientologist, this is a paramilitary unit created on the sea by L. Ron Hubbard. Dedicated staff believe that this sector of the universe suffered a terrible tragedy 75 million years ago and believe that Earth must be “cleared” — meaning all persons on the planet must undergo Scientology processing. After which it is their intention to travel to other planets to free other beings. It is their belief that Earth is part of a galactic confederacy that consists of 26 stars with 76 inhabited planets. It is believed that Earth has been zoned as a prison planet where the worst criminals and non-conformists are sent. So the Sea Org now runs Scientology under the founder’s directions. As a paramilitary unit, it evokes a theme of heavy discipline and an array of policies that do not fit in with the Church’s stated goals of serving mankind and allowing human rights to be given to all people. In fact, many policies of the Sea Org strip away these rights. The billion-year contract the Sea Org crew sign is not a religious example of faith, but, as per L. Ron Hubbard, it is estimated the planets in all will take a billion years to run through Scientology processing. While such claims are easily shown to be false, one should heed what a group of people with such beliefs are capable of if they see their beliefs as facts and anyone who opposes them as enemies.

What was your role in the Sea Org? How long were you a part of it, and what year did you leave?

I was involved in the Sea Org from 1989 through to 1996. From 1996 to late 1997 I secretly worked for the Sea Org while appearing to be a member of the public. My role in there was primarily as an enforcer over what is known as The Commodore’s Messengers — the police management which runs Scientology. I policed the police.

How widespread is the Sea Org across the globe?

It is difficult to tell. Membership has been as high as 8,000. With the policy in place of having some Sea Org crew not identify themselves as such, the figure is hard to estimate. But I would put it at about 5,000 currently. It does not sound like a lot, but when you consider each of these people put in over 100 working hours per week, the amount of manpower they can throw at projects really boggles the mind.

What kinds of projects would they undertake?

Typically, important projects that involve tackling PR-related issues only occur at Office of Special Affairs International, the L Ron Hubbard Personal Relations Office or at Commodore’s Message Organization International, and Religious Technology Center located at International Management level. The type of projects undertaken would be to identify persons and groups behind attacks on Scientology, ascertain their whereabouts, launch private investigations against them or their companies and design press releases or local actions to discredit them. In addition to this, other large projects such as the acquisition of land or property overseas or handling investments and returns from monies kept offshore — [these projects] typically take place on board the Freewinds, and all such projects involve top management.

Can you list the crimes or immoral acts you've been involved in, or witnessed, as a Sea Org member?

Some of the crimes involved other Sea Org members. The most notable crimes were the releasing of private information to the public on people we wanted blacklisted. Rapes of underage Sea Org Children were covered up. There were instances where Scientologists, as part of checking their qualifications, revealed true crimes against other civilians, such as theft, child molestation and even murder. At a price, such crimes were never divulged to the police unless the person went against Scientology. I think my most reprehensible act was requesting abortions and punishing young Sea Org members between the ages of 13 and 17 for petty crimes, making them feel very guilty and issuing severe punishments that should not be given to a human being.

You’ve said you helped brainwash children. What was the procedure for doing so?

Young children are taken into the SO — they are usually the children of SO members. Indoctrination starts at the age of four. Education is concentrated on very little and L. Ron Hubbard’s works are forced as the major reading. By the time the child is eight, they are pretty well convinced the SO is the only real thing that can save man; they believe in past lives and reject psychology and other practices as being false and evil. They see little of their families and do not learn family values. By the time they are 13 they are well prepared to commit to their duty to serve mankind for life. They have no sports, no other tendencies. The only thing they really know is Scientology.

You said you would make young Sea Org members feel guilty and issue them punishments. What methods would you use to make the kids feel so guilty? Was there a codified system of psychological torture and intimidation, and if so, what did it entail? Or were officers free to make up their own techniques? If so, what techniques did you employ?

Techniques were at the discretion of the executive, but typically they followed a common theme. Hard labor is often used, and can vary from general cleaning to intensive labor — such as handling sewage without protection. To make a person feel guilty all one needs to do is show a person how they could have prevented an infraction from taking place. This is easily done with L. Ron Hubbard’s materials, as at every corner it is made clear you are responsible for anything that happens around you, regardless of whether you are or not.

Other punishments would include being segregated from other SO members, not being allowed to talk to them or contact your family outside of the SO. Yelling is often used to introvert the person, and to show a child how his actions are commonplace in evil societies — and that, in effect, the child is as bad as [the people in those societies]. By introverting such a person, you make them willing do anything to gain acceptance and approval, even if such a punishment were to be to disconnected from their family forever.

Another form of brainwashing and training is to give the children authority to tell adults what to do. Once they feel they can control adults, they feel that they are safe and will often hold onto that state of mind. Such a state of mind can be seen in David Miscavige, who never really stopped being a dictator from an early age.

Techniques also included assignment of “lower conditions,” where the person was told they were enemies or traitors to themselves and to Scientology. The threat of losing those who you considered friends was ever-present. Children, once broken with such treatment, clearly see themselves as the source of any trouble and try to avoid receiving any punishment by being compliant to orders, regardless of the recklessness of those orders. Children are reminded that they are as responsible as adults and their failures are the results of failing to recognize that they are adults and spirits that have been around for as long as anyone else.

Also, I know several examples of child molestation and sexual assault with Scientology children where the incidents were covered up. In all cases, the child feels they allowed [the molestation] to happen, and their Scientology or Sea Org parents often agree with them. They see themselves as instigators, not victims. Once installed with this as punishment, they will never tell the police or others, as they feel they are revealing their own crimes.

Can you detail an instance of rape being covered up?

In 1992 or 1993 in Florida a young recruit was in Commodore’s Messenger Org, Clear Water. She was 14 at the time — possibly just turning 14, actually. Two other trainees from Mexico, ages 16 and 18, took her and sexually assaulted her at the same time. Upon discovery the staff were let go, but to cover up the incident and to make sure she did not feel like she could go to the police, we subjected her to eight weeks hard labor and made it clear she had been responsible for it occurring. I deeply regret ordering such a thing to be done. At the time, however, I was of the belief that the image of the Sea Org and Scientology was more important.

Can you detail an instance of false arrest?

In 1995, on St. Valentine’s Day, 15 staff from the organization that dealt with the Computer Network of Scientology were held captive in Los Angeles against their will. They were not permitted to leave. Doors were bolted. Guards were posted with express orders to refuse anyone wishing to leave. The people involved for a period of between 30-60 days were confined to working quarters with no windows, no outside communication, and no phone calls. Communication amongst themselves was permitted. They were taken by guards for two-minute showers once a day. All food was taken to them within their confined quarters, and some never saw daylight for many weeks at a time. This was thoroughly condoned at multiple levels of the SO, and no one raised alarms. Many of the staff involved suffered mental breakdowns, which was the goal. Most staff were replaced and then sent out of the SO with no money, or placed into the penal colony we had for degraded SO members.

Why were these personnel locked up in the first place?

In January, 1995, a security breach was detected whereby information relating to Scientology’s future purchases and financial records were removed and sent out via modem. As a result, the entire staff was locked down. We knew already who the perpetrator was, however we pretended not to know in order to source out any others that may have the same idea to sabotage Scientology, and also to allow our computer tracking programs to locate other external sources of potential hacks. Scientologists working at Executive Software International and other freelance computer masterminds worked in association with the Religious Technology Center and the management to coordinate a “honey pot” capture technique and also infect any hackers with viruses, so that not only could we obtain the people attempting to hack, but also the email addresses of everyone they knew. The staff at INCOMM were all treated as criminals. Even when proven innocent, they were informed that the reason for the betrayer not being spotted by them was because they were out ethics and they deserved punishments.

Can you explain an instance of forced abortion?

There are numerous incidents over the history of the SO. Of all the people I asked to abort, none factually did. One of my seniors, though, was asked by her senior to abort and did so in 1995.

What's the role of violence in Scientology?

Violence does not play a part in Scientology and few Scientologists commit acts of violence. In the Sea Org, however, mental torture is the rule of the game. Occasionally physical violence is used. I have been physically attacked by another senior SO member and I have witnessed staff being thrown around on several occasions. It is always by seniors and they are always protected.

Were there cases of violent abuse?

I am not aware of violent abuses wherein severe physical harm ever came to an SO member. One has to keep in mind that mental torture can leave more scars than a physical attack. As an example, I have suffered physical injuries, but I have nightmares about the time I was locked up for weeks and interrogated for 12 hours a day. That left and created more damage than anything physical I have experienced.

The Sea Org is notorious for its penal colonies. Where are they located? Can you list one or two specific locations?

The Pacific Base in Los Angeles, often referred to as Big Blue, is one of the largest. There is another one located in Sydney, and in the UK as well. These penal colonies are just that. I was in one of them myself and can only describe it as cruel and unusual punishment.

Who is put in them?

SO members that start to have free minds are typically placed in them. Anyone who is rebellious to management. The hope is to bring them back into line before they go fully free in their minds and try to leave the SO. Some people can be in there for up to 5 years. You are only allowed out when you are fully compliant and do whatever it is you are told to do.

You've referred to the camps as slave colonies. What are conditions like in the camps? To what degree can freedom be restricted for prisoners?

The conditions are terrible. Beyond imagination. Labor is carried out every conscious moment, beyond several hours of study every day. You must run, not walk. You cannot initiate a conversation until spoken to first. Punishments are handed out for anything, almost. You cannot see your family but a few hours each week, and you are subjected to cramped living conditions, wearing only black uniforms. Your status is depicted with armbands. It is a most uncomfortable state of living that no one in their right mind would subscribe to unless they felt they had no choice.

You said you were locked up for weeks and interrogated for 12 hours per day. Why?

When I returned from a secret mission to the Ship where my identity as a Sea Org member was hidden, I came into sensitive knowledge. Upon my return I attempted to take a break to allow my body to repair itself from the stress it was undergoing. It was thought I perhaps had gone to see the government, or other groups working against Scientology. To teach me a lesson for [purportedly] trying to leave I was locked up for a week, sleep-deprived, and interrogated by up to four different people a day.  I would sleep with people outside my door to prevent me from leaving again. I also went through a process designed to numb a person into submission and destroy their desires to fight back against things they saw as wrong. It worked for some time, and I was certainly deflated as a human.

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written by lippard, March 27, 2010
"The world is full of ex-Scientologists, but few claim to have been so highly ranked in the Church, and few have been able to offer glimpses into the weird world of the Sea Org."

Actually, the NY Times story has quotes from Mike Rinder and Marty Rathbun, who were about as high up in the Church of Scientology as you can get without being David Miscavige; both were in the Sea Org, and in Scientology for 36 and 27 years, respectively. Tom DeVocht, another recent defector who has spoken out along with Rinder and Rathbun in the St. Petersburg Times' most recent exposes, was in charge of the Sea Org headquarters in Clearwater, and was in the Sea Org for 28 years.

Saxton's account doesn't say what his role was, but his Wikipedia page says he was in the Commodore's Messenger Organization, an Ethics Officer in the Communications Office, and in some role involving International Management for Scientology in Los Angeles.

His account seems consistent with other reports (e.g., reports of coerced abortions in the testimony of Mary Taboyoyan - http://www.scientology-lies.com/marytabayoyon.html - and investigations of the Rehabilitation Project Force - http://rickross.com/reference/...en101.html ).
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@Locnar
written by bkthorp, March 27, 2010
Greetings, and thank you for reading.

All religions are fair game. On this site, I have criticized Catholicism specifically on several occasions (including in my very first Swift article, which you may read at http://www.randi.org/site/inde...s-you.html), and I have written several articles about the Christianity-inspired "witch" burnings in Kenya and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa.

What we tend not to do is criticize a religion on the basis of its dogma alone. We are interested in those areas where dogma intersects with the real world. Note that we are not "taking on God" in this article: Rather, we are taking on the behavior of a group of people who claim to have insider's knowledge of God's plan for the universe. (I.e; That God has decreed this to be a universe in which spirits, called Thetans, occasionally affix themselves to the backs of apes.) We believe they know no such things, and that any decisions they make while laboring under such delusions will likely be poor ones.

I hope this clears things up.

Danke,
- BKT
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@Locnar
written by bkthorp, March 27, 2010
Thanks for the reply.

This is, I believe, the first article to be published about Scientology during my time with the JREF. I truly, truly do think the story of the Resurrection is as ridiculous as that of Thetans, but what we're not going to do is run a story with the headline: "Breaking News: Christian Beliefs Are Silly!" Nor will we run a similar story about Scientologists.

Again: The main thing is behavior. Religiously-inspired behavior is part of our beat, but religious dogma is not. If we get a tip about some band of angry Calvinists that are up to no good, and who justify their bad behaviors with the Bible, we'll be all over it. (If you stumble upon such a tip, please send it along.)

Thanks,
- BKT
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Hmmm bad Calvinists...
written by Zoroaster, March 27, 2010
I'm thinking maybe the Family, the organization that runs the 'C Street House' in DC.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/22/AR2010022204511.html

Might be the kind of people your looking for.
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Victim to Victimizer
written by mirnaminkoff, March 28, 2010
He says he helped brainwash children, but according to the information he was a kid himself during this period? So the SO uses kids/teenager/young adults to enforce and do its dirty work? Wonder if this has something to do with the age of legal responsibility and a 16 or 17 year old not being held to the same legal standards as a 25 year old. (Much like street gangs use underage kids for dirty work because they won't receive harsh jail sentence if caught)
I read some other stuff about this guy and it appears he was born into Scientology family. I'd like to hear about the indoctrination he himself went through to get to this position in the SO. Seems like within the space of a very few years as a teenager he was heavily indoctrinated and then in turn trained to do the same to other kids. It must have been quite an experience to go from victim to victimizer within the space of a few years - also interesting to see that's how Scientology implements its control over its SO members.
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@Locnar
written by bkthorp, March 28, 2010
Locnar:

I think you read my sentence wrong. I said I find them equally ridiculous.

Hey! If you want me to go on record, I'll say this: I think Christian fundamentalism, militant Islam, and Jewish fanaticism are far greater threats to the safety of the planet than Scientology. That said, I do believe Scientology warrants a story every now and again, because a) It is demonstrably dangerous to those involved; b) its tenets are silly; and c) not a lot of folks know about it.

- BKT
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written by Locnar, March 28, 2010
Ahh. Sorry I misunderstood your statement. Thanks for clarifying.
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written by peterwbarber, March 28, 2010
The difference between a religion and a cult is one hundred years. The Mormons, Latter Day Saints, started as a cult and are now, for the most part, considered a normal religious organization. If Scientology can last for a century, it too will be considered “normal.”

The bottom line is that the god business is a very good business.
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written by Captain Al, March 28, 2010
The Sea Organization is the super-cult of this century. Totally different from being an ordinary Scientologist, this is a paramilitary unit created on the sea by L. Ron Hubbard. Dedicated staff believe that this sector of the universe suffered a terrible tragedy 75 million years ago and believe that Earth must be “cleared” — meaning all persons on the planet must undergo Scientology processing. After which it is their intention to travel to other planets to free other beings.


I suppose that with a global population of 6.8 billion it is plausible to find 8000 people who will believe this crap although it appears most of them must be indoctrinated from an early age.
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Ecclesiastical Jargon
written by StarTrekLivz, March 28, 2010
The articled mentions how jargon-laden Scientology is, but how much jargon has entered American English as a result of Christian influence, words that require large amounts of explanation? Like?

Incarnation
Trinity
Virgin birth
Transubstantiation
Original Sin
Grace
Atonement
Redemption
Resurrection
Ascension
Pentecost

these are all Christian theological terms in common use in the USA (even though Christians may disagree about the meanings & parameters) -- they only seem less strange because they've been around longer. They are no less cult inspired.
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written by lippard, March 28, 2010
Caller X: "Penal colony" is probably overstating it, but he's referring to the PAC RPF.

See, e.g.: http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?t=15688

Note in particular the posts from Chuck Beatty, Bea Kiddo, and Ladybird.
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written by lippard, March 28, 2010
Oh, BTW, "Big Blue," where the PAC RPF is (or was) housed, is the former Cedars Sinai/Cedars of Lebanon Hospital in Los Angeles at 4833 Fountain Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90027.

On Google Maps: http://maps.google.com/maps?q=...0027&gl=us
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And there's this...
written by Pseudonym888, March 28, 2010
http://www.google.com/hostedne...QD9EN4N181
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written by KenR, March 28, 2010
Caller X says:
NONE of the non-Scientologist computer consultants who were held captive for over a month went to the police?


But Saxton said:
In 1995, on St. Valentine’s Day, 15 staff from the organization that dealt with the Computer Network of Scientology were held captive in Los Angeles against their will.


In other words, Caller X, all the computer consultants were Scientologists.

Caller X says:
The AP article cited by Pseudonym888 says that SeaOrg has 5,000 members, yet the subject article says that Scientology has 8,000 members. Those numbers just don't pass the reasonableness test.


But Saxton said, in response to the question "How widespread is the Sea Org across the globe?":
Membership has been as high as 8,000. With the policy in place of having some Sea Org crew not identify themselves as such, the figure is hard to estimate. But I would put it at about 5,000 currently.


So, Caller X, nobody is saying Scientology has 8,000 members. Saxton is saying the Sea Org has 5,000 - 8,000 (at its height) members.
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written by KenR, March 28, 2010
Caller X asks, "How does Mr. Saxton earn his living????"

According to the Wikipedia article linked to in the 4th paragraph, "In 2009, Saxton resided in Perth, Australia, and worked as an information technology contractor."

Presumably he still works in IT.
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@CallerX
written by bkthorp, March 28, 2010
Greetings, and thank you for reading.

Nearly all of Aaron's accusations have been reported elsewhere, in isolation, by other Sea Org defectors. (The exception is the bit about the tooth.) Sure, they may all be lying -- but I cannot imagine why they would open themselves to lawsuits from the famously litigious CoS (or why ex-Scientologists Marc and Claire Headly would bother taking their very serious charges of "slave labor" to court) if there wasn't at least a grain of truth in these weird allegations.

If there isn't, it would be easy enough for The CoS to let us know: Allow a journalist to come in and conduct private interviews with Sea Org members. But journalists who are granted access to Scientology's camps (or "campuses") are closely monitored, and their conversations are recorded by the Church. For good information on this subject, we therefore must rely on former Sea Org members no longer connected with The CoS. All such people we've encountered have the same kinds of things to say: Slave labor, psychological intimidation, kids separated from their families, etc. These claims are widespread, and have been reported over and over again, from The New York Times to The LA Times to The Daily Mail. What we haven't yet seen is the flood of protests from ex-Sea Org members with nice things to say about their former organization. Those people are laying low.

Also: Aaron Saxton did include addresses with many of the locations he mentioned in the interview. We removed them to make the prose less clunky. (The specific locations are MapQuestable, anyway.)

Again, thanks for reading.

- BKT
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written by KenR, March 28, 2010
Caller X wrote:
KenR,
Thank you for calling me on those things I got wrong. Please to be applying those same critical skills to the original article.
"According to the Wikipedia article linked to in the 4th paragraph, 'In 2009, Saxton resided in Perth, Australia, and worked as an information technology contractor.'"
Okay, I guess. After all, if it's on Wikipedia, it must be true.


Wikipedia's source for Saxton residing in Perth:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/nov/18/scientology-torture-allegations-australia

The source for his work as in information technology contractor is an Australian show called Today Tonight (http://au.todaytonight.yahoo.com/) broadcast November 18, 2009. I haven't been able to find the videos from it specifically, but there are many interviews with Mr. Saxton from around that period:

http://www.youtube.com/user/AaronSaxtonSpeaks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqzT8ZOD6mc
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Jargon?
written by GeorgeFromNY, March 28, 2010
STLivz,

While centuries of Judeo-Christian cultural influence have of course resulted in large amount of related terms being present in English (and other languages), this does not let Scientology off the hook for "jargon."

There is a difference between the inevitability of specialized vocabulary in any kind of technical or scholarly subject and outright obscurantism.

Overhearing two electrical engineers, medical doctors or archaeologists "talking shop" will very likely baffle the rest of us, but there is no intent towards avoid scrutiny. Nobody is trying to hide anything.

Can the same be said for Scientology? I rather doubt it.
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Hmmm....the jury's still out
written by Trez, March 29, 2010
Whilst an interesting article in itself, Im afraid I have to agree with some other posts that this is essentially an account of one person's experience of Scientology. Whilst his allegations may correlate with the accounts given by various other members of the CoS, its still just the account of one person and with little factual substantiation

Im not saying his allegations aren't true, (I don't actually know, not being an investigative journalist myself) and the information thats produced by the general media indicates that this is a very dangerous organisation, but it does beg the question of why, if these crimes (and they are crimes irrespective of statutory periods) are occurring as described, why aren't there more police investigations into these activities?

If the CoS are routinely employing false imprisonment and torture and covering up the sexual abuse of minors, then why isn't Mr Saxton speaking to the law-enforcement authorities rather than the press?

It does seem that where there is some evidence of these allegations being true that (you'd hope) further criminal investigation and charges would be forthcoming
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@peterwbarbar
written by GusGus, March 29, 2010
The difference between a religion and a cult is:

Mine is a religion, yours is a cult.

I think this is the only definition that everyone would agree with.
.
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Hey, Caller X!
written by ElecTech, March 29, 2010
Scientology charges hundreds of dollars for e-meters. I could build you one for about $20, and still make money.
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written by Mick Houlahan, March 30, 2010
Hey, I'm all for hating the Scientologists - they're scumbags, pure and simple. That said, I'm not buying much of what this guy says. smilies/grin.gif

Quick now - vote this post down for being skeptical.
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Everyone poking holes in this article:
written by Griz, March 30, 2010
I guess you better go out and do the research before you start criticizing this person's experience. It's kinda disingenuous to take this article in isolation and say "well maybe it's true but it might be made up too." It's just one person's account. Instead of spending your time writing a post that says I don't know that doesn't sound very reasonable, why don't you spend that time research the subject on the internet (starting with links provided in these comments) and discover that there's plenty of corroboration by ex-scientologists for most of what this artcle reports.
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the Death of Ath*ism - Scientific *PROOF* of God, Lowly rated comment [Show]
From Aaron Saxton
written by aaronsaxton, April 12, 2010
I have seen some of the comments.

In regards to the RPF - the penal colonies, they are not secret, and no address is required. The Sea Org does not deny they exist and public can see them in Glebe Street, Sydney and also L Ron Hubbard Way in Los angeles.

In relation to the crimes, I did report them while I was still culpable. Media and no one else was interested. It took 9 years before anyone would actually investigate the claims. The church of Scientolgoy just calls me a liar but refuses to comment on each allegation I have made, and the reason for that is because the claims are true. If there is any doubt Scientology lies, I invite you to view the Australian aired program on Today Tonight with Bryan Seymour where it is shown how Sue Hunt with Sea Org management in Australia attempted to set me up for a restraining order - they completely lied and I ahve the video proof which was shown on TV.

In relation to the INCOMM situation, not true. there are plenty of witnesses and testimony from people on what happened. Including comments by people involved.

Really, it is clear that some are more interested in just defending Scientology than actually researching the incidents involved. If there is any doubt, write David Miscavige and ask if there was a security breach in INCOMM in 1995 and if a mission was sent to INCOMM to fix it with Liz Ingber. If there is any further doubt, contact Amy Scobee and Laura Dieckman who knew factually I went on a mission to the Freewinds ship in the Carribean to fix the securtiy situation on the Ship. There is a mountain of eivdence stacked so high it is incredible.

And as for Einstein - I invite you to read the FULL quotes he made regarding religion. Dawkins settles this dispute without and doubt in his book "The God Delusion".

As always, I am happy to accept any emails from critics although to date not a single one has taken me up on that offer. And no church official will speak with me despite numerous requests.

aaronsaxton1@gmail.com
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written by lippard, May 06, 2010
Aaron: Did this INCOMM security breach happen after the "-AB-" incident on alt.religion.scientology, in which a Caltech alumnus working for INCOMM posted confidential Scientology material to the newsgroup (trying to be helpful to Scientology's case)? That was in January 1995--1995 must not have been a comfortable year for INCOMM.
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